Meeting documents

Children's Services and Leisure Overview and Scrutiny Panel
Monday, 4th August, 2008

Web Agenda/Minutes Summary Document

Meeting Name:
Children's Services and Leisure Overview and Scrutiny Panel

Meeting Date:
08/04/2008 Pick

Meeting Time:


Location:


Sub Committee / User Forum etc (if required):




Members Present:

Non-Members Present:

Confidentiality: Part I


Document Type: Agenda


Document Status: Final




N O T I C E

O F

M E E T I N G

CHILDREN’S SERVICES AND LEISURE
OVERVIEW AND SCRUTINY PANEL

will meet on

4 august 2008

at

7.30 pm

in the

COUNCIL CHAMBER, TOWN HALL, MAIDENHEAD

TO: ALL MEMBERS OF THE CHILDREN’S SERVICES AND LEISURE OVERVIEW AND SCRUTINY PANEL
        COUNCILLORS MAXWELL (CHAIRMAN), MISS BARTON, J EVANS, LENTON, MRS PITTEWAY (VICE-CHAIRMAN), MRS STOCK AND FIDO.

        MR GIBBONS (PORTSMOUTH DIOCESAN REPRESENTATIVE) AND MRS MINTERN (OXFORD DIOCESAN REPRESENTATIVE)

        SUBSTITUTE MEMBERS
        COUNCILLORS BASKERVILLE, MRS BURSNALL, MRS ENDACOTT, MRS HERDSON, MRS HUNT, MRS LUXTON AND MAJEED
    Ian Hunt
    Interim Head of Democratic Services

    Issued: 25 July 2008

    Members of the Press and Public are welcome to attend Part I of this meeting.

    The agenda is available on the Council’s web site at www.rbwm.gov.uk or contact the
    Panel Administrator Michael Kiely (01628) 796560
    In the event of the fire alarm sounding or other emergency, please leave the building quickly and calmly by the nearest exit. Do not stop to collect personal belongings and do not use the lifts. Congregate in the Town Hall Car Park, Park Street, Maidenhead (immediately adjacent to the Town Hall) and do not re-enter the building until told to do so by a member of staff.
    AGENDA

    PART I

    ITEMSUBJECT
    WARD
    PAGE
    NO
    1APOLOGIES FOR ABSENCE

    To receive any apologies for absence.
    2DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

    To receive Declarations of Interests from Members of the Panel in respect of any item to be considered at the meeting.
    3MINUTES

    To confirm the Part I minutes of the meeting of the Panel held on 2nd June 2008.
    i-iv
    4*PANEL WORK PROGRAMME

    To consider and discuss the Panel’s programme of work.

    To note that the following items are scheduled for discussion at a special meeting of the Panel on 1st September 2008:
      Review of secondary school designated areas
      Action to combat bullying

    To also note that the following items are scheduled for discussion at the meeting on 29 September 2008:
      Service Monitoring Report
      Appointment of School Governors
    5*APPOINTMENT OF LEA REPRESENTATIVES TO GOVERNING BODIES OF SCHOOLS IN THE ROYAL BOROUGH

    To comment upon the report being submitted to Cabinet on 28 August 2008 on the Appointment of School Governors.




    All
    1
    6CUSTOMER CARE ANNUAL REPORT 2007/2008 – CHILDREN’S SOCIAL CARE SERVICES

    To receive a report informing Members about the Social Care complaints process and the level and nature of the complaints and compliments received by Children’s Social Care services, Learning and Care Directorate during the period 1 April 2007 to 31 March 2008.
    All
    24
    7*14 – 19 DEVELOPMENTS IN THE ROYAL BOROUGH OF WINDSOR AND MAIDENHEAD

    To consider the report on 14-19 Developments in RBWM.
    All
    30
    8*HOME TO SCHOOL TRANSPORT GUIDELINES 2008/2009

    To comment upon the report being submitted to Cabinet on 28 August 2008 on the Home to School Transport Guidelines.
    All
    52
    9*CO-OPTION OF MEMBERS RELATING TO EDUCATION MATTERS

    To consider the co-option of additional members to serve on the Panel.
    All
    67
    10*SERVICE MONITORING REPORT

    To receive the latest service monitoring report in respect of Children’s Services and Leisure services.
    All
    69
    11LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT 1972 – EXCLUSION OF THE PUBLIC

    To consider passing the following resolution :-

    “That under Section 100(A)(4) of the Local Government Act 1972, the public be excluded from the remainder of the meeting whilst discussion takes place on items 12 and 13 on the grounds that they involve the likely disclosure of exempt information as defined in Paragraphs 1-7 of part I of Schedule 12A of the Act"

    * Education Related Item

    9
      APPOINTMENT OF LEA REPRESENTATIVES TO GOVERNING BODIES OF SCHOOLS IN THE ROYAL BOROUGH

      CABINET : 28 August 2008

      MEMBER REPORTING: COUNCILLOR MRS QUICK
    1. PURPOSE OF REPORT

      To consider the vacancies that have arisen or will shortly arise for Local Education Authority (LEA) representatives on school governing bodies within the Royal Borough, and of nominations that have been received, so that appointments may be made.

    2. MEMBER’S RECOMMENDATIONS:
      That Sue Dudley or Muhammad Saleem is appointed to Furze Platt Senior, Mary Stock is appointed to Maidenhead Nursery and the following governors are re-appointed; Andre Davidson, Dorothy Kemp, Emrys Richards and Barbara Muir.


    3. SUPPORTING INFORMATION

    3.1 Applications were received for the following vacancies:
    School
    Ward
    Name
    Furze Platt Senior School
    Furze Platt
    Sue Dudley
    Furze Platt Senior School
    Furze Platt
    Muhammad Saleem
    Maidenhead Nursery
    Furze Platt
    Mary Stock

    The final approval of which applicant becomes an LEA governor lies with Cabinet.

    3.2 Wards Affected

    Furze Platt, Cox Green, Park

    3.3 Relevant Matters Upon Which Decision is Based and Reasons Supporting Recommendation

    Details of vacancies that have arisen within the borough are given below. Details of candidates seeking appointment are given in the attached Appendix A. All appointments should be made in accordance with the authority’s Code of Practice on the Appointment of LEA Governors.

    3.3.2 Existing vacancies
      On 21st July there were 13 vacancies for LEA governors at schools within the Royal Borough at the following schools:
        SchoolWard
        No. Vacancies
        All Saints C.E. Junior SchoolBoyne Hill
        1
        Braywood C of E First Bray
        1
        Clewer Green C of EClewer East
        1
        Datchet St Mary’sDatchet
        1
        Dedworth Green FirstClewer North
        1
        Eton Wick C of E First SchoolEton Wick
        1
        Furze Platt Senior SchoolFurze Platt
        1
        Hilltop First SchoolClewer South
        2
        Holy Trinity Primary School SunningdaleSunningdale
        1
        Maidenhead Nursery Furze Platt
        1
        Oakfield First Clewer East
        1
        Windsor Boys’ Castle Without
        1
      This represents a vacancy rate of 1.2% of the total number of governors or 8.3% of LEA governors. Ward Councillors for these vacancies have been notified via an e-mail.
    3.3.3 Governors Seeking Re-Appointment
      The following education LEA governors are about to reach the end of their current term of office and have submitted nomination forms seeking re-appointment for a further term of office.
      Representative seeking
        School Ward Reappointment
        Andre DavidsonFurze PlattYes
        Dorothy KempCox GreenYes
        Emrys RichardsCox GreenYes
        Barbara MuirParkYes

    3.3.4 Future vacancies

      LEA governors at the following schools will reach the end of their current term of office before August 2008. Letters are sent to each governor inviting them to apply for re-appointment. Applications are invited from Members and other interested individuals for consideration for these positions at the time of the next report.
      Current representatives

    School Ward Term of office ends Re-submitting
    Furze Platt Senior SchoolFurze Platt22/08/2008 Yes
    Cox Green SchoolCox Green31/08/2008 Yes
    Cox Green SchoolCox Green31/08/2008 Yes
    Trevelyan Middle SchoolPark31/08/2008 Yes
    Wessex Primary SchoolCox Green31/08/2008 No


    3.4 Options Available and Risk Assessment

      Under the Authority’s Code of Practice, nominations will only be considered if submitted on the appropriate application form prior to a published closing date. Appointments to fill any of the vacancies in this report can only be made from the nominations listed in the schedule at Appendix A.

      OptionComments
      1.To select an appropriate applicant from those included to be recruited to the corresponding vacancy.If it is deemed that the skills and knowledge of the applicant meet the needs of the schools it will be an advantage to the governance resource of that school to endorse the application immediately.
      2.To defer some/all appointments to a future meeting. Members select applications for recruitment at alternate Cabinet meetings. This means that a delay could add a further two months to the application process. The DCSF recommend that appointments should normally be made to fill vacancies within three months.
      3.To reject some/all applications.Members have the right to reject applications. This would be on the basis that the applicant’s skills and knowledge will not support the school and does not fit with the current required need.

      The risk assessment identified the role of a focused, continual marketing campaign to attract applications, to ensure a diverse choice of applicants for Members final decision.

    3.5 Reasons Supporting Recommendation

      Under the Authority’s Code of Practice, schools have the right to advise the authority of their governing body’s needs in terms of balance of skills, gender or any other consideration for the good of the school, and to submit names for consideration.

      If the person appointed does not match the specified needs of the governing body and/or the governing body’s preferred candidate is rejected, the governing body may request the authority to give its reasons.

      Candidates have the right to decline an appointment if it does not meet their preferences.

    3.6 Relevant National/Regional Guidance

    The DCSF has now issued guidance on the governance constitution regulations as mentioned in paragraph 5.2 below.

    The appointment of school governors contributes to the Community Strategy in the following ways: it supports the three guiding principles of working together, leaving no-one behind and involving people. Those appointed as school governors can support schools to address three of the five key themes, namely learning for life, being safe and secure and caring and health.

    4. CONSULTATION CARRIED OUT

    4.1 Governing bodies are invited to comment on candidates’ suitability for re-appointment and to submit nominations to fill these and any casual vacancies that arise. Where a school has expressed a view, this is noted in the candidate’s details, as listed in Appendix A.

    4.2 Following the closing date for receipt of applications, those applicants who have not requested one particular school are matched to current vacancies, taking account of a variety of factors including any expressed requirements or preferences of both schools and candidates, and the proximity of a school to a candidate’s home or business address. As far as possible, schools and applicants are then contacted to discuss the options available and to ascertain that they have no objection to the recommendation proposed.

    5 OVERVIEW AND SCRUTINY PANEL COMMENTS.

    6. IMPLICATIONS

    6.1 Financial

    There are no additional financial implications in this report.

    6.2 Legal

    The composition of governing bodies is set out in the Education Act 2002, the School Governance (Constitution) (England) Regulations 2007. School Governance (Federation) (England) Regulations 2007 and School Governance (New Schools) (England) Regulations 2007. If a school has concerns with the LEA governor appointment, which are not satisfied by the provision of Cabinet decision notes on the appointment, the school may:
      1. Make a complaint to the Local Government Ombudsman
      2. Submit an application to judicially review the decision
      3. Direct their concerns to the Secretary of State under Part IX Education Act 1996 i.e. the involvement of the Secretary of State to determine disputes. This provision allows for applications to be made to the Secretary of State for directions etc. by governing bodies (and the LA itself). The Secretary of State has power to:
      - determine disputes directed to him

      - prevent unreasonable exercise of functions and give directions

      - declare that a body has acted in default and give directions

      - secure performance of a local authority’s functions and give directions

    6.3 Human Rights Act
      1. There are no Convention Right under the Human Rights Act relevant to this Report.
      2. None of the Convention Rights will be affected by this decision.
      3. This decision does not affect any victims as defined under the Human Rights Act.

    6.4 Planning

    There are no planning implications in this report.

    6.5 Sustainable Development

    LEA governors could seek to promote the Council’s sustainable development policies within their governing bodies.

    6.6 Diversity and Equality
      In terms of the Council’s Equality Impact Assessment Policy, the recommendations in this Report have no negative equality and diversity implications.


      Background Paper: Code of Practice for the Appointment of Education Authority Governors
    APPENDIX A

    DETAILS OF CANDIDATES LISTED IN ORDER OF SCHOOLS

    Criteria for Appointment

    LEA governors will be chosen on the basis of the contribution they can bring to a school in terms of their skills and experience as specified in their nomination form, taking account of any supporting information provided by the candidate or by the school.

    FURZE PLATT SENIOR SCHOOL

    ONE APPOINTMENT
    Previous ExperienceMrs Dudley has a qualification in Education and a teaching certificate. She has four children in Education, and has developed an understanding of education through their development and her own academic qualification.
    Reason for ApplicationMrs Dudley has experience of being a Director of a Research Agency and so has developed skills in strategic planning, analysis and marketing. Mrs Dudley would like to use her skills for the benefits of the community.
    Other relevant
    information
    Mrs Dudley has a first class Degree in Education and a set of business skills that she believes will be of value to the school.


    DR SALEEM MUHAMMAD

    FURZE PLATT SENIOR SCHOOL

    ONE APPOINTMENT
    Previous ExperienceDr Saleem is a teacher in the private sector so has a wealth of education experience.
    Reason for ApplicationDr Saleem would like to use his experience as a teacher combined with his links to the Asian community to help establish the need for parental responsibility and involvement to help their children achieve.
    Other relevant
    information
    Dr Saleem has worked as Head of Department and as College Principal.


    COUNCILLOR MARY STOCK

    MAIDENHEAD NURSERY

    ONE APPOINTMENT
    Previous ExperienceCllr Stock currently works with Courthouse Junior school as an LEA governor and has a background in teaching; previously working at Newlands school for 16yrs as Head of Modern Languages.
    Reason for ApplicationMaidenhead Nursery is in Cllr Stock’s ward and she believes the start of education is a vitally important stage for young children. Cllr Stock is also interested in the new Children’s Centre and working with one of the few state nurseries in the borough.
    Other relevant
    information
    Cllr Stock believes her background in teaching and experience as a councillor will be of help to the nursery.

    DR ANDRE DAVIDSON

    FURZE PLATT SENIOR SCHOOL

    RE-APPOINTMENT
    Previous ExperienceDr Davidson has eight years experience working as a governor in the Royal Borough and has developed a great deal of experience which allows him to make a positive impact at Furze Platt Senior School.
    Reason for ApplicationDr Davidson is proud of the developments at Furze Platt Senior School over the past four years and would like to continue as a governor to help the school further. Dr Davidson sits on the majority of the governing body committees and takes an active role in the school’s Self Evaluation Form (SEF) review.
    Other relevant
    information
    Dr Davidson regularly attends governing meetings and training sessions. Dr Davidson’s re-application is supported by the school.


    COUNCILLOR DOROTHY KEMP

    COX GREEN SCHOOL

    RE-APPOINTMENT
    Previous ExperienceCouncillor Kemp has been an LEA governor for Cox Green School for many years and also sits on the governing body as an LEA governor at Woodlands Park Primary School.
    Reason for ApplicationCouncillor Kemp feels she has been a support and help to the school over the years and would like to continue to do so.
    Other relevant
    information
    Councillor Kemp regularly attends governing meetings and training sessions. Councillor Kemp’s re-application is supported by the school.


    COUNCILLOR EMRYS RICHARDS

    COX GREEN SCHOOL

    RE-APPOINTMENT
    Previous ExperienceCouncillor Richards has been a governor at Cox Green School for over 16yrs.
    Reason for ApplicationCouncillor Richards believes that being a local councillor he has skills to give to Cox Green, particularly with his impending retirement.
    Other relevant
    information
    Councillor Richards regularly attends governing meetings and training sessions. This re-application is supported by the school.



    BARABRA MUIR

    TREVELYAN MIDDLE SCHOOL

    RE-APPOINTMENT
    Previous ExperienceAs well as being an LEA governor at Trevelyan, Mrs Muir is also an LEA governor with Eton Wick First School.
    Reason for ApplicationHaving put a lot of hard work in to helping Trevelyan successfully come out of an OFSTED category, Mrs Muir would like to continue to work with the governing body to help move the school even further forward.
    Other relevant
    information
    Mrs Muir was involved in the appointment of the new Headteacher and would like to support him in this role.
    Appendix B - Re-appointment dates of current Governor posts for 2008-2009, listed by end date.
    SchoolDate Due for Re-appointment
    Furze Platt Senior School22/08/2008
    Cox Green School31/08/2008
    Cox Green School31/08/2008
    Trevelyan Middle School31/08/2008
    Wessex Primary School31/08/2008
    Trevelyan Middle School31/08/2008
    Cookham Rise Primary School22/09/2008
    Furze Platt Senior School22/09/2008
    Homer First School25/09/2008
    Homer First School13/11/2008
    Holyport Manor School31/12/2008
    Larchfield Primary and Nursery School26/01/2009
    Woodlands Park Primary School31/01/2009
    Cheapside Primary School23/03/2009
    Charters School31/03/2009
    Knowl Hill School10/04/2009
    Braywood First School17/04/2009
    Desborough School25/05/2009
    Dedworth Middle School31/05/2009
    Dedworth Middle School31/05/2009
    Courthouse Junior School28/06/2009
    Datchet St Mary’s CE Primary School27/07/2009
    Desborough School27/07/2009
    Dedworth Green First School31/08/2009
    Oldfield Primary School31/08/2009
    Oldfield Primary School31/08/2009
    White Waltham School31/08/2009
    White Waltham School31/08/2009
    Windsor Boys’31/08/2009
    Windsor Boys’31/08/2009
    Eton Wick First School31/08/2009
    Newlands Girls’ School31/08/2009
    Charters School04/09/2009
    Ellington Primary School21/09/2009
    St Edmund Campion Primary School25/09/2009
    Trevelyan Middle School06/11/2009
    Holyport Manor School08/11/2009
    Cookham Rise Primary School23/11/2009
    Lawns Nursery School23/11/2009
    Desborough School23/11/2009
    Newlands Girls’ School23/11/2009
    Trinity St Stephen23/11/2009
    Wraysbury Primary School23/11/2009
    Wraysbury Primary School23/11/2009


    24

    CHILDREN’S SOCIAL CARE SERVICES
    CUSTOMER CARE ANNUAL REPORT 2007/2008
    LEARNING AND CARE DIRECTORATE

    REPORTING OFFICER: DAVE HORLER,
    HEAD OF STRATEGY & RESOURCES

    1 PURPOSE OF REPORT

    1.1 To inform Members about the Social Care complaints process and the level and nature of the complaints and compliments received by Children’s Social Care services, Learning and Care Directorate during the period 1 April 2007 to 31 March 2008.

    2 SUPPORTING INFORMATION

    2.1 The Children Act 1989 requires the operation of the complaints procedure to be reported to Members. The information covered should be anonymised information about the numbers and types of complaints and compliments received.

    OFSTED’s view is that more complaints should be recorded with them being resolved at stage 1 of the process. This identifies any trends and also indicates that service users concerns are being listened to and acted on.

    In addition to this Annual Report, complaints are monitored by
        Monthly report for Learning and Care Directorate Information Bulletin
        Monthly report for Corporate Centre which is discussed at Directors Group
        Quarterly report to Cabinet

        Recommendations arising from complaints are monitored for implementation.

    2.2 Objectives of the Complaints Procedure
        The legislation and guidance states that the objectives of the procedure are:
    · Accessible and easy to understand
    · Provide a strong problem-solving element
    · Speedy
    · Guarantee a considered response
    · Provide information on how policies translate into practice
    · Highlight areas where the authority should be more responsive to the needs of individuals and the community.
    2.3 Legislative Framework
        The Children Act 1989 provides the legal framework for Social Care services complaints procedure together with timescales, who can access the procedure and the appointment of an Investigating Officer and an Independent Person at the second stage of the process.

        Local Authority Circular LAC (2004) 11 "Regulations and Guidance on Providing Effective Advocacy Services for Children and Young People Making a Complaint under the Children Act 1989" refers to the guidance from the Department for Education and Skills entitled "Get It Sorted. There is now a duty on local authorities under section 26A of the Children Act 1989 to make arrangements for the provision of advocacy to children and young people making or intending to make representations (including complaints) under the Children Act 1989.

    2.4 The Complaints Process
        In brief, the complaints process is in 3 stages: (Please see flow chart at Appendix 1)

        Stage 1 (Local Resolution)
        The operational manager of the service about which the complaint is received, attempts to resolve the matter. The aim is to resolve the complaint as close as possible to the point of service delivery and the service user. An acknowledgement must be sent within 3 working days and a response sent in 10 working days (which can be extended to 20 working days with the complainant’s agreement).

        Stage 2 (Investigation)
        The complainant decides whether they are satisfied with the outcome of the stage 1 and, if not, can request to progress to stage 2. This request must be received within 20 working days of the stage 1 response. If the complaint is sufficiently serious, the complainant can access the procedure direct at stage 2.

        An Investigating Officer (and an Independent Person if the complainant is vulnerable) are appointed by the Customer Care Co-ordinator. They will look into the issues of the complaint and provide a report to the Head of Service outlining their findings within 25 working days.

        The Head of Service writes a response to the complainant on behalf of the Directorate using the Investigating Officer’s report as a basis for the response. The letter states whether or not the complaint is upheld, or partially upheld, and any actions the Directorate proposes to take to remedy the situation.
        Stage 3 (Review Panel)
        The complainant decides that they are not satisfied with the response at Stage 2 and requests progression to Stage 3 of the process. This request must be received within 20 working days of the stage 2 response.

        A Review Panel is convened by Democratic Services to review the investigation into the complaint, the Directorate’s response and the outcomes within 30 working days. The Panel consists of 3 independent people.

        The Director of Learning and Care responds to the complainant once the conclusions and recommendations of the Panel have been received within 15 working days.

        After the above procedure is completed the complainant can, if they so decide, refer the matter to the Local Government Ombudsman.
      2.5 Redress

          The usual redress offered when a complaint or part of a complaint is upheld is to review the service offered and/or the procedure that was followed. An explanation of any action to be taken and, where appropriate, an apology will be conveyed to the complainant. An offer of an ex gratia payment could be made for the time and trouble of bringing the complaint to the Directorate’s attention and any exceptional distress caused. No ex gratia payments have been made during this reporting year.

      2.6 Breakdown of Compliments and Complaints Received
          During the period 1 April 2007 to 31 March 2008 the following have been notified to the Customer Care Co-ordinator.

          (i) Compliments

      In this reporting period, 33 compliments were notified to the Customer Care Co-ordinator as having been received in Children’s Social Care services. 29 compliments were about the quality of service provided and 4 in relation to the attitude/conduct of staff.





          (ii) Complaints

          Stage
          Number
          Cost
          Stage 1
          56
          Stage 2
          1
          £3081.96
          Stage 3
          Overall Cost of Children’s Services Complaints for the reporting year 1 April 2007 to 31 March 2008 £3081.96

      Details are provided in Part 2 of this report

      98% of complaints were resolved at stage one. The national average is 92%.
          The level of complaints also compares well with other similar sized local authorities.
      Inspections of children services have stated that the current processes are robust and used well by the public.


      2.7 Resolution Times

          Of the 56 concerns recorded, 10 were not fully responded to within the 10 working day timescale.

          However, all of these were responded to within the allowed 20 working day timescale having gained the consent of the complainant to extend the deadline.

          The delays were due to either the complexity of the complaint requiring more time for the operational manager to investigate and fully respond or with arranging a time to meet the complainant before responding.



      2.8 Representations

          Any negative comments received (rather than formal complaints) are recorded as a representation. This is not a formal complaint and does not have to be responded to within a set time frame. In this first reporting period for representations there has been a total of 83 recorded negative comments. It is likely as more service users are aware of how to log a negative comment, that the figure for representations will be higher for the period 2008/2009.


      30
        14-19 DEVELOPMENTS IN ROYAL BOROUGH OF WINDSOR AND MAIDENHEAD

        CHILDREN’S SERVICES AND LEISURE OVERVIEW & SCRUTINY
        PANEL: 4TH AUGUST 2008

        MEMBER REPORTING: COUNCILLOR MRS QUICK
      1. PURPOSE OF REPORT
        The paper is provided in two sections:
        1. An outline of the local and national developments and issues within the 14-19 reform agenda for The Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead.
        2. A draft 14-19 Education Plan which will form an integral part of the Children’s and Young Peoples Strategic Plan and will shape the commissioning of education provision and services for 14-19 year olds in the local area
        The purpose of the report is to ensure members/officers are familiar with key elements of the 14-19 reform agenda and can reach informed decisions about the strategic direction outlined in the 14-19 Education Plan.

      2. OFFICER'S RECOMMENDATION:

        That the report is noted and the implications of 14-19 reforms are incorporated into planning and policy.
      3. SUPPORTING INFORMATION

      3.1 Wards Affected
        14-19 year olds and their families in all Wards are affected
      3.2 Relevant Matters Upon Which Decision is Based & Reasons Supporting Recommendation

      3.2.1 In the last three years there has been far reaching reform in 14-19 education and training, with particular impetus from the 14-19 Education and Skills White Paper (2005), 14-19 Implementation Plan (2006), and Leitch Report on Skills (2007).
        The reforms emphasise the overall strategic lead for Local Authorities for planning, commissioning and delivery of 14-19 education and training. This can only be achieved by working in partnership with other agencies and providers and with other Local Authorities and institutions to enable effective cross border provision.
        The 14-19 reforms have three main themes
        Raising Attainment – getting more young people on to learning programmes that meet their needs and help them achieve their potential.

      New Qualifications and Curriculum Models – providing programmes, which better prepare young people for life and work, enabling them to participate in, and benefit from, local economic activity.

      Delivery – creating local arrangements and infrastructure, which are fit for purpose and capable for the integrated 14-19 entitlement.

      3.2.2 Diplomas will be available in The Royal Borough from September 2009. The Strategic Partnership is committed to achieving an entitlement curriculum to diplomas by 2013, but recognises the advantages of supporting partnership arrangements across authority boundaries. Planning in this way makes effective use of specialist provision and recognises the significant number of learners who travel to learn across the wider area. (Approximately 20% of pupils of school age live outside the borough’s boundaries)

      In Gateway 2 (December 2007) RBWM applied to offer Diploma lines in
        Construction and the Built Environment and Environmental and Land Based Studies
        Construction achieved a category 2, which means we can begin delivery in September 2009.
        Society Health and Development was applied for in Gateway 1 and we have now met all conditions to begin delivery from September 2009
        Environmental & Land Based Studies achieved category 3, which means we are not ready for 2009, but with conditions, will mean a 2010 start. This Diploma is being jointly developed with Reading, Slough and other Local Authorities.
        The 14-19 Strategic Partnership are now considering diplomas for Gateway 3 (November 2008) and expect to develop a submission for Sport & Active Leisure for delivery from September 2010.

      3.2.3 A Vocational Skills Centre (East Berkshire Skills Centre) opened in September 2007 as part of a second vocational (applied) specialism at The Windsor Boys’ School. This provides vocational courses for 14-16 year olds in an adapted industrial premise. The Skills Centre has increased the percentage of Yr 10 students accessing vocational provision.

      3.2.4 Young Apprenticeships (YAs) for 14-16 year olds are established at Berkshire College of Agriculture (BCA) and more recently have developed as a partnership between Charters, a specialist Sports College and The Windsor Boys’ School. It is envisaged Young Apprenticeships will continue to be offered, subject to continuing funding and appropriate demand.

      3.2.5 International Baccalaureate (IB) is a two- year Post 16 Diploma qualification at Level 3. It is the intention of the government that from September 2010, there will be at least one institution in each local authority offering the IB programme. Charters school has been identified as a potential IB school and is considering a partnership arrangement with other schools.

      3.2.6 Machinery of Government changes were announced in June 2007. Significantly this included 16-18 funding for education and training would be transferred from the Learning and Skills Council (LSC) to local authorities (LAs) from 2010.

      3.2.7 From 2010 the LSC will be replaced by the Young Peoples Learning Agency (YPLA) a Non –Departmental Public Body working to the Department Children Schools & Families (DCSF) and The Skills Funding Agency (SFA), part of the Department of Innovation, Universities and Skills (DIUS).

        The two agencies will have regional and national capacity and will share the key priorities of

        Raising the school leaving age
        Improving attainment
        Delivering 14-19 reforms and the entitlement

      3.2.8 Local Authorities will be accountable for meeting the learning needs of all young people in their area up to the age of 18, in line with the raising of the compulsory school leaving age.

      3.2.9 LAs will develop strategic commissioning plans for their areas, working with neighbouring authorities, assessing demand and supply of 16 – 18 provision.

      3.2.10 LAs will also be responsible for provision for learners with learning difficulties and disabilities (LDD) to the age of 25

      3.2.11 The Directors of Children’s Services and 14-19 advisers met with Directors from the Thames Valley LSC on 30th June 2008. There were several recommendations for Berkshire Chief Executives to consider:
        1. That Berkshire is declared a sub-region for the proposed machinery of government change
        2. That the sub-region takes responsibility for:
            commissioning FE provision in Berkshire
            commissioning provision for 16-25 year old students with learning difficulties and disabilities in Berkshire
            sharing good practice in relation to diplomas, and where desired sharing access to diploma provision beyond LA boundaries
        3. That the governance of this commissioning activity is nested in the Berkshire Economic Strategy Board (BESB) structure and a new 14-19 Commissioning Group becomes a sub group under that structure
        4. That Directors of Children’s Services work with the LSC to propose options for resourcing and staffing this joint commissioning activity which include the option of a shared service for delivering it.
        5. That we prepare a joint paper on these issues that can be put to the Cabinets of the respective Councils during the Autumn –informally in the first instance











      3.3 Options Available and Risk Assessment

        Option
        Comments
        1. Promote partnerships and structures that support the implementation and development of a range of vocational qualifications including DiplomasThis work is ongoing and Diploma delivery in partnership with Slough can begin Sept 2009
        2. Restrict number of Diploma lines on offer in the boroughThis will reduce the number of learning options for young people
        3. Develop the planning, commissioning and delivery role of the Local Authority and its Strategic Partnership The DCSF 14-19 Implementation Plan highlights key role of LAs and Strategic Groups in delivering reforms

      3.4 Relevant National/Regional Guidance
        14-19 Education and Skills White Paper (2005)
      14-19 Implementation Plan (2006)
      Leitch Report on Skills (2007)
      Promoting achievement, valuing success; a strategy for 14-19 qualifications.
      Machinery of Government Changes – 14-19 Funding and Organisation (2007)
      The Children’s Plan: Building Brighter Futures DCSF
        3.5 Relevant Council Policies/Strategies

          RBWM The Children and Young Peoples Plan 2008 -2011

          The recommendations contained in this report also contribute to the Community Strategy in the following ways:

          Relevant?
          Yes / No
          Key Themes:
          Supporting Children & Younger People
          Yes
          Supporting Adults & Older People
          Yes
          A Thriving, Cleaner, Greener Borough
          Yes
          Safer & Stronger Communities
          Yes
        4. CONSULTATION CARRIED OUT

          The 14-19 Education Plan has been developed through consultation with the 14-19 Strategic Partnership. The group includes the key stakeholders in 14-19 policy including Connexions, LSC, FE College Principles and Headteachers from Secondary Schools.





        Appendix
        Membership of 14-19 Strategic Partnership
        .
        Mr. Jeff DawkinsHeadteacher: The Windsor Boys’ School.
        Mr. Andrew LinnellHeadteacher: Desborough School.
        Mrs. Marcia TwelftreeHeadteacher: Charters School
        Ms. Tanya WhiteHeadteacher: Furze Platt Senior School
        Mrs Jean RobertsonPrincipal: East Berkshire College EBC
        Mr Peter ThornPrincipal: Berkshire College of Agriculture BCA
        Mrs. Kath DunnRBWM Connexions Partnership Manager
        Ms Shereen SamersingheLSC East Berkshire Partnership Director
        Mr Edmund BradleyDeputy Group Accountant
        Mr Martin Mahoney14-19 Consultant
        Mr Cliff TurnerHead of Children & Young People
        Mrs Angela Wellings (Chair)Area Children & Young People Team Manager

          Other colleagues can be invited for specific business items.
        Draft Version 3
        35
        The Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead
        14-19 Education Plan
        2008 - 2013
        36
        * 1 Delivering World Class Skills in a Demand led system – LSC/DfES Consultation 2007

        * 2 The Children’s Plan- Building Brighter Futures 2008?


        The Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead 14-19 Education Plan

        1. Purpose
        The Education Plan for The Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead is an integral part of the Children’s and Young Peoples Strategic Plan and will shape commissioning of education provision and services for 14-19 year olds in the local area.

        It also outlines the vision and progress of the 14-19 Strategy.

        2. Background
        In the last three years there has been far reaching reform in 14-19 education and training, with particular impetus from the 14-19 Education and Skills White Paper (2005), 14-19 Implementation Plan (2006), and Leitch Report on Skills (2007).

        The reforms emphasise the overall strategic lead for Local Authorities for planning, commissioning and delivery of 14-19 education and training. This can only be achieved by working in partnership with other agencies and providers and with other Local Authorities and institutions to enable effective cross border provision.

        The 14-19 reforms have three main themes

        Raising Attainment – getting more young people on to learning programmes that meet their needs and help them achieve their potential.

        New Qualifications and Curriculum Models – providing programmes, which better prepare young people for life and work, enabling them to participate in, and benefit from, local economic activity.

        Delivery – creating local arrangements and infrastructure, which are fit for purpose and capable for the integrated 14-19 entitlement.

        Alongside the 14-19 reforms, machinery of government changes (July 2007) announced that 16-19 funding *1 for sixth forms and colleges will be delivered through Local Authorities (LAs) from 2010/11 (subject to legislation) and that there is a similar relationship between LAs and Education Business Partnership Organisations (EBPOs) for the delivery of work related learning and employer engagement.

        The 14-19 Plan must also take account of the Children’s Plan *2 and specifically the intention to raise the participation age to 17 from 2013 and 18 from 2015

        3. Vision
        The vision articulated in the 14-19 Strategy is that
        In the Royal Borough all young people will be inspired to learn and reach their full potential.

        The Strategy seeks to put young people at the heart of their learning process, to remove barriers – so that learning is enjoyable, stimulating and relevant to learners’ needs in the 21st Century.50

        Through partnership the Strategy will increase and widen participation, improve achievement and ensure all learners have equal opportunities to progress to further learning or training

        The key objectives agreed by the 14-19 Strategic Partnership are to:
          promote a vision for a 14-19 education that is inclusive, promotes an entitlement for learning for all and challenges inequality.
          have strategic oversight of education and training for 14-19 year olds in the Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead.
          lead, implement and evaluate the impact of the 14-19 Strategy for the Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead.
          plan high quality learning pathways, relevant to the aspirations of the learner and based on a clear assessment of local area needs.
          ensure a breadth and choice of provision that raises achievement and leads to progression in education training and employment.

          prioritise and direct the work of any 14-19 task groups.
        4. Local and regional economic context
        The Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead is a high achieving unitary authority in the east of Berkshire. Achievement and participation in education and learning is high. The labour market is generally buoyant, though there are small numbers of young people who are not in employment, education and training (NEET).

        At a ward level there are pockets of deprivation, where some adults have poor basic skills. The retail, construction and leisure sectors of employment continue to show a high demand for suitably skilled labour due to major construction and regeneration
        projects.

        5. Progress
        The Royal Borough has made good progress in implementing and developing the 14-19 Strategy since 2003. The lead partners, The Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead, Berkshire LSC * 3, Connexions and schools and FE Colleges have worked closely to ensure the engagement of all stakeholders.

        5.1 Partnerships
        The 14-19 Strategic Development Group was initiated in May 2001 to promote the newly emerging 14-19 agenda and following a major review commissioned by the Unitary Authority to review Post 16 provision throughout the borough.

        A 16-19 (Post 16) Strategy was agreed in September 2001 and in July the following year the Strategic Group agreed a Strategy for Specialist Schools – Promoting Diversity and Excellence. A 14-19 Strategy with terms of reference and membership of the Strategic Development Group was developed and agreed during 2003.

        During 2006 the strategic group reviewed its membership and terms of reference taking account of the 14-19 White Paper, the Implementation Plan and the Every Child Matters agenda. The group was renamed the14-19 Strategic Partnership.

        The Annual Performance Assessment (APA) 2007 graded Achieve Economic Well Being as Grade 3 (Good) and commented on -- a revitalisation in partnership working to deliver the diplomas. It also noted --good collaboration with neighbouring Authorities … to maximise provision and avoid duplication. Schools and Colleges are more enthusiastic to be involved and there is an increased awareness of the needs for partnerships.

        Currently the Strategic Partnership has links with Higher Education through both its FE partners and Progress South Central – the Lifelong Learning Network for Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire and Surrey. Progress South Central is a partnership of universities and colleges working to develop and support vocational students into and through Higher education. The University of Reading is a core partner of Progress South Central and has a 14-19 working group attended by a representative of the Strategic Partnership

        Partnership and collaborative working is beginning to develop with neighbouring Local Authorities and providers beyond the Borough. The Education Plan seeks to maximise the benefits to learners through cross boundary working, but recognise and overcome the operational challenges this may prevent.

        There are well-established partnerships between groups of schools and colleges within Windsor and Maidenhead. In Maidenhead there has been a Federation of five Secondary schools since 2003, and a successful Sixth Form Consortium.


        6 Joint Area Review and Annual Performance Assessment

        6.1 Joint Area Review
        The JAR outcome for achieving economic well-being - 2005 was adequate. The report noted the consistently high numbers of young people in education, training and employment, but limited progress in the implementation and support for the 14-19 strategy, and a limited range of vocational courses. Connexions was providing good support for vulnerable young people, but not all pupils are receiving impartial advice and guidance, from their schools on the full range of opportunities outside their own sixth forms.
        Recommendations from JAR
          The Connexions service, schools and partners should improve access to impartial information, advice and guidance to all children and young people on the full range of options available to them at age 16 (Action within 6 months)
          Improve the access to post- 16 provision at levels below advanced level, including for young people with learning difficulties and/or disabilities
          Provide access to a broader range of vocational options for young people aged 14 and above

        6.2 Annual Performance Assessment
        The APA judgements for achieve economic well-being – 2007 was good. The report noted a positive response to the issues identified in the JAR. In particular there was an increased range of vocational courses at KS 4 and 5 and some good initiatives to extend vocational initiatives.

        The report also identified easily accessible impartial information available to young people at ages 14 and 16 and the contribution of the Berkshire Opportunities website (BOPs)

        The Royal Borough has very high rates of young people staying in education and training post 16 and the proportions is well above national averages and those of similar authorities.

        Table 1 Post 16 Young people staying in education and training EET June 2008

        Aged 16
        Aged 17
        Aged 18
        16-18 Total
        Aged 19
        Aged 20+
        Cohort Total
        Cohort total
        252
        1446
        1395
        3093
        1301
        108
        4502
        EET Total
        248
        1365
        1321
        2934
        1211
        76
        4221
        In education, post Year 11
        218
        1172
        1053
        2443
        855
        57
        3355
        School Sixth Form
        161
        818
        654
        1633
        144
        0
        1777
        Sixth Form College
        0
        0
        0
        0
        0
        0
        0
        Further Education
        57
        353
        323
        733
        205
        44
        982
        Higher Education
        0
        0
        73
        73
        498
        13
        584
        Part time Education
        0
        1
        2
        3
        1
        0
        4
        Gap Year students
        0
        0
        1
        1
        7
        0
        8
        Other Post 16 Education
        0
        0
        0
        0
        0
        0
        0
        Employment
        26
        180
        263
        469
        352
        17
        838
        Employment funded through GST
        2
        20
        51
        73
        68
        0
        141
        Employment with training to NVQ 2 or above
        3
        18
        37
        58
        41
        2
        101
        Employment without training to NVQ 2
        6
        63
        86
        155
        116
        9
        280
        Employment with locally recognised training
        10
        47
        55
        112
        91
        2
        205
        Temporary employment
        1
        12
        12
        25
        13
        1
        39
        Part Time Employment
        4
        20
        22
        46
        23
        3
        72
        Training
        4
        13
        5
        22
        4
        2
        28
        LSC funded E2E training
        3
        9
        4
        16
        3
        0
        19
        Other LSC funded training
        0
        1
        0
        1
        0
        0
        1
        Other GST (eg, LA or ESF funded provision)
        1
        3
        1
        5
        1
        1
        7
        New Deal
        0
        0
        0
        0
        0
        1
        1


        The proportion of young people not in employment, education or training (NEET) is very low. This includes groups of vulnerable young people including those with earning difficulties and /or disabilities and teenage mothers.

        Achievement is high and in the past three years there has been consistent improvement in both attainment at levels 2 and 3 by 19. The percentage of young people completing an apprenticeship framework has more than doubled and is close to the national average.

        Area(s) for development
          Consolidate partnership working
          Ensure that curriculum planning is clearly based on local skills needs and the demand from young people


        7. DCSF 14-19 Progress Checks
        Progress Checks occur annually and are co-ordinated by the Government Office for the South East (GOSE). They combine a self-assessment of progress with centrally held statistical data under specific qualitative and quantitative performance indicators. The 15 indicators are graded on a four-point scale (1 being the highest) and aggregated to give an overall judgement in progress.

        The 14-19 Progress Checks are shown as measures of success, within the Strategic Priorities on pages 11 -15

        The Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead achieved Amber Green – Grade 2 overall in the most recent Progress Check – May 2007.

        8. Diploma Gateway Feedback
        The Diploma Gateway is the application process for Local Authorities and partnerships to apply to the DCSF to offer Diplomas. The Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead made submissions to Gateway 1 (December 2006) and 2 (December 2007), to offer a range of Diplomas in the borough.

        The Gateway 1 submission was to offer diploma lines in ICT, Construction & the Built Environment and Society Health & Development. We were required to resubmit for ICT and Construction but achieved a category 3 for Society Health & Development, which meant we were not ready for delivery in 2008, but once specific conditions were met we could deliver from September 2009

        The Gateway feedback identified issues including Following Gateway 1 the 14-19 Strategic Partnership agreed we would support high quality submissions that evidenced clear planning; added value to the provision in the area, met identifiable local needs and was built on existing relationships and specialisms. For these reasons we agreed to work with Slough and other neighbouring Local Authorities to deliver an entitlement to diplomas by 2013

        On this basis the Gateway 2 submission was for Construction & the Built Environment and Environmental & Land-based Studies. Both submissions reflected partnerships, which span Unitary Authority boundaries. In Gateway 2 we were successful in meeting all conditions set for Society Health & Development (from Gateway 1) and for Construction recommended for delivery from September 2009, but with conditions to meet within 3 months.

        9. Achievement and attainment
        The borough is a high achieving local Authority and standards achieved by most children at all key stages continue to be above the national average. GCSE attainment for young people achieving five or more grades A*- C including English and Maths is consistently well above the national average and has been improving over the last few years (APA enjoying and Achieving - 2007)

        Table 2 5+ A* - C GCSEs at 16

        TargetNational 20062006National 20072007National 20082008National Target 2011Target RBWM
        2011
        5 + GCSEs A* - C at 1659%64%62%65%62% 2010 LAA

        The proportions of RBWM residents reaching Level 2 and 3 by 19 are much higher than national averages. However the overall percentage of young people that achieve at least one GCSE grade A* - G is lower than found in similar authorities.

        Table 3 Level 2 and 3 at 19 and % gaining one qualification at end of KS4

        TargetNational 20062006National 20072007National 20082008National Target 2011Target RBWM
        2011
        L2 Attainment at 1971%80%79%74%80%82%85%
        L3 Attainment at 1947%62%60%48%61%54%65%
        % gaining at least one qualification at end of KS497%98%98%98%2010 LAA 99.5%

        The LA in partnership with LSC uses the Berkshire Plus Value Added data to provide schools with detailed analyses of progress by pupils at subject level

        Most vulnerable children and young people, for example those with learning difficulties and/or disabilities and looked after children, make good progress compared with other similar groups nationally.

        Table 4. KS4 % 5A* - C including English and Maths -2007

        2007
        All pupils
        Not SEN
        Classified as SEN
          England
        45.5
        53.9
        9.4
          Windsor & Maidenhead
        54.7
        62.3
        15.5

        The overall effectiveness of the majority of schools is good or better. However secondary and middle schools have fewer schools judged good or better than similar authorities nationally.

        In 2006-07, 27 borough schools were inspected. 15 were judged as good or better. However, only one of the five secondary schools inspected was judged good or better. So far in 2007-08 three secondary schools have been inspected. Two were judged to be good or better and one was found to satisfactory having previously been given a notice to improve

        Area(s) for development
          Increase the overall effectiveness of Secondary and Middle- deemed secondary schools (CYPP EA2)
          Increase the percentage of young people attaining one or more A*- G grades
          Narrow the attainment gap so that vulnerable and potentially underachieving children achieve the highest possible standards
        (CYPP EA1)


        10. Curriculum
        Since JAR 2005 all schools have broadened their curriculum offer to include applied courses in both Key Stages 4 and 5. This includes Applied GCSEs, BTECs and OCR Nationals. Some schools have specific vocational pathways combining their own vocational courses and external providers such as The Skills Centre or an FE College

        There are also an increased number of KS 4 students accessing applied provision either in local FE Colleges, a Schools Skills Centre or Training Provider. For example in the current cohorts an increased proportion of Year 10s access vocational courses away from the school site.

        Table 5 KS4 students accessing Vocational applied learning away from a School setting

        Year group 2007-08
        No in cohort
        No’s on Voc –offsite study
        % on Voc offsite study
        Yr 10
        1570
        219
        14%.
        Yr 11
        1635
        135
        8.25%
        Totals
        3205
        354
        11.04%

        Since 2002 all RBWM Schools have had some involvement with the Increased Flexibility Programmes (IFP) offered at East Berkshire College, BCA or Bracknell and Wokingham College. Vocational courses for 14-16 year olds continue to run in all local FE providers.

        A Vocational Skills Centre (East Berkshire Skills Centre) opened in September 2007 as part of a second vocational specialism at The Windsor Boys’ School. This provides vocational courses for 14-16 year olds in an adapted industrial premise. The Skills Centre has increased the percentage of Yr 10 students accessing vocational provision, but there has been a consequent decrease in students using former IFP provision at both FE Colleges.

        Young Apprenticeships are established at BCA and more recently have developed as a partnership between Charters, a specialist Sports College and The Windsor Boys’ School. It is envisaged Young Apprenticeships will continue to be offered, subject to continuing funding and appropriate demand.

        Diplomas will be available in The Royal Borough from September 2009. The Strategic Partnership is committed to achieving an entitlement curriculum to diplomas by 2013, but recognises the advantages of supporting partnership arrangements across authority boundaries. Planning in this way makes effective use of specialist provision and recognises the significant number of learners who travel to learn across the wider area. (Approximately 20% of pupils of school age live outside the borough’s boundaries)

        Show details about planning toward diploma delivery.

        Foundation Learning Tier is a programme of study at entry and level 1 for post – 14 learners. Units and qualifications in the Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF) will provide a progression pathway up to level 2.

        Units may form a bridge to, or be delivered as part of the curriculum for the Diploma at level 1. Trials are currently taking place with delivery parallel to the Diploma roll out. Full implementation will be complete by 2010

        The foundation learning tier is suitable for a wide range of 14-19 learners who are working at entry level/and or level 1. This includes students with learning difficulties and/or disabilities, those who may be disengaged and those unable to achieve their full potential through GCSEs. It will be possible to combine units from the foundation learning tier with a level 1 Diploma or GCSEs.

        Both local FE Colleges currently offer similar programmes at post 16 for young people with specific needs.

        Post 16 provision mainly consists of academic level 3 courses, though all Sixth Forms now have some provision at level 2. One of the actions from Achieve Economic well being in the JAR 2005 was to improve access to post-16 provision at levels below advanced level, including for young people with learning difficulties and/or disabilities.

        The APA 2007 noted progress in this area (in outcomes for achieving economic well-being), though further work is needed to audit the full range of provision in order to ensure that the needs of all learners are catered for, particularly those with Learning Difficulties or Disabilities or those in other vulnerable groups. This will assist curriculum planning noted in 6.2 above

        International Baccalaureate (IB) is a two-year Post 16 Diploma qualification at Level 3. Currently the programme is not available in the Royal Borough, but it is the intention of the government that from September 2010, there will be at least one institution offering the IB in every Local Authority.

        Charters school is leading the development of IB and is exploring the potential for partnership with other RBWM schools.

        Area(s) for development
          Develop and enable access to a full range of learning opportunities (including educational and vocational) for 14 -19 year olds so that all young people are able to benefit from employment, education and training (CYPP EW1)

        11. Meeting specific identified needs
        ACE project and Alternative Curriculum l
        NEET,
        SEN
        LDD
        Looked After Children (Children in Care)
        E2E
        Targeted and integrated youth support

        12.Quality Assurance

        13 Information advice and guidance

        14 Access and Transport

        15 Employer Engagement

        16 Capital & Funding


        17. Links to LAA and Children and Young People’s Plan
        The 14-19 Education Plan is an integral part of the Children and Young People’s Plan and will shape the commissioning of education provision for young people, by setting out the contribution of local providers.

        The Education Plan makes explicit links with the C&YP 2008-11 and feedback from both JAR and APA. There are links between the Children’s Trust and the Executive Board/ Commissioning Group so that resources are directed towards the priorities identified in this Plan

        The Key Priorities from the Children & Young Peoples Plan
          Develop and enable access to the full range of learning opportunities (including educational and vocational) for 14-19 year olds, so that all young people are able to benefit from employment education and training (Achieve Economic Well Being)
          Narrow the attainment gap so that vulnerable and potentially underachieving children achieve the highest possible standards (Enjoy and Achieve)
          Improve the life chances for all children and young people by raising the proportion of middle and secondary schools judged by OFSTED to be good/outstanding (Enjoy and Achieve)
          Reduce disaffection amongst vulnerable young people through targeted youth support (Making a positive contribution)

        Local Area Agreements 2008-11
        A number of targets occur in the Children and Young People block of the LAA. Specifically there are local targets to
          Increase the provision of a range of vocational options for 14-19 year olds by introducing diplomas within the Royal Borough
          Reduce the 16-18 year olds who are not in education, training or employment

        18. Strategic Priorities 2008 – 2015 Linked to RBWM Children & Young Peoples Plan.

        1.Participation and Engagement – Achieve Economic Well Being & Making a positive contribution
          Improve access to, (and) participation in education and training.

        2. Achievement & Attainment - Enjoy & Achieve
          Narrow the attainment gap so that vulnerable and potentially underachieving children achieve the highest possible standards.
          Increase the percentage of young people attaining one or more A*- G grades.

        3. Progression – Achieve Economic Well-Being
          To improve the proportion of young people who progress to Levels 1, 2 and 3) by the age of 19.




        4. Collaboration and Partnership – Achieve Economic Well Being & Making a positive contribution
          Consolidate and improve partnership working in order to further develop and enhance 14-19 provision across the area.
          Ensure that curriculum planning is clearly based on local skills needs and the demand from young people.

        5. Quality Improvement – Enjoy and Achieve
          Improve the quality of provision for 14-19 learners throughout the Borough.

        STRATEGIC PRIORITY 1: PARTICIPATION AND ENGAGEMENT Key Priorities MPC1 and EWB1

        To improve access to (and) participation in education and training (14-19)
        Specific Outcomes:

        - Maintain an increasing percentage of young people in RBWM (14-19) in structured learning through developing and ensuring
        - Access to appropriate education and training pathways
        - Reduce the proportion of 16-18 year olds who are NEET
        Key actions to secure the priority

        1.1 Increase the range and availability of vocational and applied learning qualifications 14-19
        1.2 Develop Diploma lines in RBWM from 2009
        1.3 Reduce the number of 16-18 year olds who are not in education, training or employment NEET
        1.4 Support and develop strategies to improve participation for young people from vulnerable groups including LAC and those
        with specific needs
        14-19 Progress Check Indicators:
        1. Increase % of 17 year olds participating in education and work-based learning
        2. Reduce the proportion of 16-18 year olds who are NEET



        STRATEGIC PRIORITY 2: ACHIEVEMENT & ATTAINMENT Key Priority EA1
        To improve learner achievement (14-19) in RBWM
        Specific Outcome:

        - All young people (14-19) are inspired to learn and have the opportunity to achieve their full potential
        Key actions to secure the priority:

        2.1 Monitor attainment at Key Stage 4 and provide support and challenge where there is underachievement
        2.2 Monitor attainment post 16 in schools, colleges and work-based learning providers and challenge and support where there is underachievement
        2.3 Increase the proportion of young people entering and completing an apprenticeship and promote apprenticeship opportunities
        2.4 Increase the percentage of young people attaining one or more A* - G grades
        2.5 Narrow the attainment gap so that vulnerable and potentially underachieving children achieve the highest possible standards.
        14-19 Progress Check Indicators:
        4. % of young people achieving Level 2 by 19
        5. % of young people achieving Level 3 by 19
        6. Increase in the % of young people achieving Level 2 by 19
        7. Increase in the % of 5 A*-Cs at GCSE or equivalent (including English and Maths)
        8. Increase in the % of young people completing an Apprenticeship
        STRATEGIC PRIORITY 3: PROGRESSION Key Priority EWB1
        To improve the proportion of young people who progress to Levels 1, 2 and 3 by the age of 19
        Specific Outcomes:

        - Develop clear learning pathways for learners
        - Provide opportunities for all young people to progress in education or training until they are 18
        - Secure high quality, coordinated and impartial information, advice and guidance that will build on prior attainment
        and provide access to appropriate progression routes
        Key actions to secure the priority:
        3.1 Track and analyse learner destinations at 16,17 and 18 and meet the September Guarantee*
        3.2 Increase the proportion of learners using the Berkshire 14-19 Area Prospectus (BOPs)
        3.3 Increase the percentage of learners progressing to higher education
        3.4 Review and develop the offer for young people who are vulnerable, underachieving and disaffected.
        14-19 Progress Check Indicators:
        3. To improve the proportion of Year 11 learners who progress through the qualifications framework (i.e. L1, L2 and L3) by the age of 19.
        * Young people who leave Year 11 receive an offer of a suitable place in learning (September Guarantee)

        STRATEGIC PRIORITY 4: COLLABORATION & PARTNERSHIP Key priorities EWB1 and MPC1
        To improve collaborative working to further develop and enhance 14-19 provision across the area.
        Specific Outcomes:
        - Ensure that curriculum planning is clearly based on local skills needs and the demand from young people
        - Ensure there is a sufficiently wide range of learning opportunities to meet local needs and meet entitlement across the area
        - Support partnership and collaborative arrangements with other local authorities and providers in order to develop an entitlement for learners and secure a high quality, inclusive offer for young people and their families.
        Key actions to secure the priority
        4.1 Review membership and terms of reference of the 14-19 groups on an annual basis
        4.2 Undertake the annual 14-19 Progress checks and other self-evaluations and improvement plans as required
        4.3 The 14-19 Strategic Partnership provides appropriate monitoring and support for collaboration within and between other
        14-19 groups
        4.4 Ensure that the Berkshire 14-19 Area Prospectus (BOPs) and on-line application system is updated and reviewed on a regular basis
        4.5 Provide data to review targets and measure progress across Windsor & Maidenhead
        4.6 Agree the funding and resources to be allocated to develop the 14-19 offer
        4.7 Ensure employers are represented on 14-19 groups and fully involved in planning for all aspects of 14-19 qualifications
        14-19 Progress Check Indicators:
        9. Does the area have effective collaborative arrangements in place?
        10. Is the area making progress in developing a local prospectus, and is there good quality IAG to support young people in their choices?
        11. Are there effective links with employers to involve them in sufficient high quality delivery?
        STRATEGIC PRIORITY 5: QUALITY IMPROVEMENT Key Priority EWB1
        To improve the quality of provision for 14-19 learners throughout the Borough
        Specific Outcomes:
        - Extend the range and quality of learning opportunities and learning pathways available to young people
        - Ensure that young people are supported in making informed choices based on impartial IAG
        - Share best practice between providers
        - Ensure that facilities throughout the borough meet the needs of learners
        Key actions to secure the priority:
        5.1 Monitor the quality of impartial IAG available to 14-19 year old learners on an annual basis and provide additional support where required
        5.2 Ensure all young people who leave Year 11 receive an offer of a suitable place in learning (September Guarantee)
        5.3 Expand and strengthen the quality of opportunities for vocational and work-related learning
        5.4 Provide sufficient training and CPD opportunities to prepare the workforce to deliver planned provision
        5.5 Ensure there are sufficient and appropriate facilities locally to deliver a broad range of high quality applied and vocational learning
        14-19 Progress Check Indicators:
        12. Is there a sufficiently broad range of quality 14-19 provision, including vocational options?
        13. Is there effective targeted provision, including the capacity to deliver the September Guarantee?
        14. Are there sufficient facilities across the area to deliver a broad range of high quality provision?
        15. Is the workforce across the area prepared to deliver a broad range of high quality provision?



        51
        SPRUCE Form E - Template Date 04/01/05



        KEY CHART 4 - RISK ASSESSMENT FORM SPRUCE FORM E
        Organisation / department / function / project ; 14-19 reforms, draft Education Plan and Machinery of Government changes
        Business Objective: To contextualise local and national 14 –19 developments and reforms
        Completed by : Martin Mahoney Date completed : 22nd July 2008

        No Risk

        (Threat/Opportunity to achievement of business objective)
        Assessment of Risk
        [As it is now]
        Risk Control Measures Assessment of Residual Risk
        [With control measures implemented]
        ResponsibleTimescale
        Impact
        (Severity)
        [I]
        Likelihood
        (Probability)
        [L]
        Risk
        Score
        [IxL]
        Impact
        (Severity)
        Likelihood
        (Probability)
        Residual Risk Score
        Diplomas are not accessible to all learners in RBWM224Promote partnerships and structures that support the implementation of a range of vocational qualifications including Diplomas224LA and Strategic Partnership2008- 2013
        Strategic Partnership and LA have capacity, expertise and resources to undertake commissioning and delivery role224Strategic Partnership develops strategic capacity in planning, commissioning and delivery of 14-19 education and training.212LA and Strategic Partnership2008- 2010
        Directors of Children’s Services and LSC work towards a Berkshire sub–region for machinery of government changes326Phased development work towards a joint paper for Cabinet approval
        224Director of Children’s Services and LSC 2008 -2010

        Please use as many of these sheets as required
        Risk Score
        Overall Rating
        11-16
        High
        5-10
        Medium
        1-4
        Low

          54
            HOME TO SCHOOL TRANSPORT GUIDELINES

            CABINET: 28th AUGUST 2008

            MEMBER REPORTING: COUNCILLOR MRS QUICK
          1. PURPOSE OF REPORT

            To seek Members’ approval for the new Home to School Transport Guidelines that are intended to come into effect in September 2008. The guidelines have been updated in the light of the Education and Inspections Act, 2006.
          2. MEMBER'S RECOMMENDATION: That Members approve the Home to School Transport Guidelines for the academic year 2008-9.
            3. SUPPORTING INFORMATION

            3.1 Wards Affected

              All wards may be affected by the contents of this report.
            3.2 Relevant Matters Upon Which Decision is Based & Reasons Supporting Recommendation
              3.2.1 The Royal Borough is responsible for a broad range of schools which generally provide high quality education. The Royal Borough is keen to ensure that access to its schools is not limited by economic disadvantage.
                3.2.2. The basis for the school transport eligibility criteria stems from the Education Act,1996. This Act requires local authorities to make ‘suitable’ arrangements for pupils to attend school, but does not define what is suitable. The Education and Inspections Act, 2006 and subsequent guidance sets out more clearly what constitutes an ‘eligible child’ for transport purposes. It details local authorities’ responsibilities to publish a sustainable transport policy and sets out more generous transport criteria for pupils from low income households.

                3.2.3 The Guidelines (shown as appendix A to this report) simply reflect changes in legislation rather than any deliberate local policy development. A cross party group consisting of officers and Members will review transport policy in the Royal Borough in more detail and report to Cabinet in the Spring of 2009.
                  3.2.4 Hitherto, children under the age of eight have been entitled to free transport to the nearest appropriate school if the journey from home is more than two miles. Children over the age of eight have been entitled to free transport to the nearest appropriate school if the journey is over three miles. The Education and Inspections Act, 2006, requires the addition of a new eligibility criterion from September 2007:
                      Children between the ages of 8 and 11 from low income households are now entitled to free transport if the nearest appropriate school is over two miles from home.



                    There is also a new eligibility criterion from September 2008:
                      Children over the age of 11 of low income families are now entitled to free transport to any of their nearest three appropriate schools between three and six miles, and to the nearest appropriate school preferred by reason of a parent’s religion or belief between two and 15 miles.
                  3.2.5 Low income families are defined as children who are entitled to free school meals or whose parents are in receipt of the maximum level of Working Tax Credit.
                    3.2.6 Distances are measured using the shortest available walking route between the home address and the school, which may include footpaths and public rights of way where applicable: the child being accompanied as necessary.
                      3.3 Options Available and Risk Assessment
                        It is recommended that the Guidelines be adopted without modification. Members have the following options
                        1Adopt the Guidelines as presentedThis will ensure compliance with legislation
                        2Adopt the Guidelines with modification(s)The Guidelines presented are based on national guidance. Further consultation would be required to make further modifications.
                        3Not to adopt the revised GuidelinesThis would leave the Royal Borough in breach of the law.
                          A risk assessment of the introduction of the revised Guidelines is attached as Appendix B.
                            3.4 Relevant Council Policies/Strategies

                              Children and Young People Plan 2008-2011
                              Learning for Sustainability Strategy

                              The recommendations contained in this report also contribute to the Community Strategy in the following ways:
                              Relevant?
                              Yes / No
                              Key Themes:
                              Supporting Children and Younger PeopleYes
                              Supporting Adults and Older People No
                              A Thriving, Cleaner, Greener BoroughYes
                              Safer and Stronger CommunitiesYes
                            4. CONSULTATION CARRIED OUT

                              No consultation has taken place on these proposals as the policy changes are as a result of changes in legislation. However, it is recommended that the review of policy is undertaken over the next year in the following policy areas:
                                Provision of transport for looked after children
                                Provision of discretionary transport to denominational schools
                                Post 16 transport
                                Additional options for transport, e.g. using budget resources to fund
                              alternative schemes of transport such as bicycles.

                            5. COMMENTS FROM OVERVIEW AND SCRUTINY PANEL
                              TO BE COMPLETED AFTER THE OVERVIEW AND SCRUTINY COMMITTEE HAVE MET.
                            6. IMPLICATIONS
                              6.1 Financial

                                The eligibility changes discussed above mainly affect the mainstream pupils budget (under 16). Total expenditure on mainstream under 16 pupils for the financial year 2008-09 is predicted to be around £440k, but the costs of the eligibility changes for pupils from low income families is expected to be a small proportion of this. The Royal Borough has a £25,000 grant during the current financial year (rising to £62k in 2010-11) to meet the expected additional costs of implementing the new criteria. It is not anticipated that demand will exceed this budget although this is a complex area subject to multiple factors.
                              6.2 Legal
                                Relevant legislation includes the Education Act, 1996 and the Education and Inspection Act 2006.
                              6.3 Human Rights Act
                                The Convention Right under the Human Rights Act relevant to this report is Article 2 of the First Protocol, i.e. the right to education.
                              6.4 Planning
                                There are no planning implications arising from the present report.

                              6.5 Sustainable Development
                                It is in the interests of sustainable development to encourage the use of public transport, walking and cycling, and to discourage the use of private vehicles.

                              6.6 Diversity and Equality
                              67
                                CO-OPTION OF MEMBERS RELATING TO EDUCATION MATTERS

                                CHILDREN’S SERVICES & LEISURE OVERVIEW & SCRUTINY PANEL: 4 AUGUST 2008

                                REPORTING OFFICER: ANDREW SCOTT, DEMOCRATIC & CIVIC SERVICES MANAGER

                              1. PURPOSE
                                The Panel is invited to consider the co-option of additional members to serve on the Panel when dealing with education matters in addition to the statutory church and governor representatives that are currently appointed to serve on the Panel.

                              2 RECOMMENDATION
                                Members are asked to consider whether additional co-opted Members should be appointed to serve on the Children’s Services and Leisure Overview and Scrutiny Panel, and if so, which groups or individuals should be represented.

                              3 SUPPORTING INFORMATION

                              3.1 In accordance with Section 21 of the Local Government Act 2000, Overview and Scrutiny Panels are able to co-opt people who are not members of the authority, although, in general, such co-optees will not have voting rights. However, church and parent governor representatives have the right to be appointed with voting rights onto the Children’s Services and Leisure Overview and Scrutiny Panel (i.e. the relevant overview and scrutiny panel whose functions relate wholly or partly to any education matters).

                              3.2 Co-opted members are not expected to attend for those agenda items that are not concerned with education issues. However, they can make a full contribution to the Overview and Scrutiny Panel’s discussions on ALL matters, not just those on the co-optee’s specialist areas and can raise issues for consideration by the Panel.

                              3.3 Following the disbanding of the Children and Young People's Consultative Forum in May, it was suggested that the Panel consider the possible co-option onto this Panel former education representatives that served on that Consultative Forum. The Forum Membership included representatives from the teaching unions, headteachers, Education Business Parrtnership and school governors.
                                3.4 At present the Panel’s membership comprises the 2 statutory church representatives, 1 from the Church of England Diocese and 1 from the Roman Catholic Diocese. The 2 statutory voting parent governor representatives (one from the secondary sector and one from the primary sector) are currently vacant, although work is in hand to identify parent governor representatives to serve as co-opted members on the Panel. There are currently no non-statutory non-voting co-opted members serving on the Panel.

                                3.5 However, It should be noted that, notwithstanding the abolition of the Children and Young People’s Consultative Forum, membership of the Panel is not the only avenue for consultation on school matters. There are a number of consultative arrangements available through which the Council consults/engages with schools and education partners, such as the Children’s Trust, School’s Forum, Headteachers Policy Forum, the Admissions Forum and regular Chairs of Governors meetings.

                                3.6 Although co-opted members may have a valuable contribution to make to the work of the Panel, bringing with them their own expertise and interests, Members should be mindful that too many co-opted members may make the Panel unwieldy. Also, as they would be almost exclusively connected only to the education side of the Panel’s work too many “education” representatives could unbalance the Panel.

                                3.7 The possible time commitment that a particular co-opted individual may be able to commit to the Panel should also be taken into account as it is likely that they may also be engaging with the Council and representing their respective organisation in another consultative capacity. Headteachers had previously raised concerns that there were too many groups at which Headteachers attendance was required. Also, concerns had been raised by some groups and individuals that had served on the former Children and Young People’s Consultative Forum that their time was being stretched and that they would prefer to focus their time and energy on key meetings, such as the Children’s Trust.

                                Conclusion

                                3.8 As explained, the Council already engages/consults with education representatives in a variety of ways and Members should consider whether the co-option of additional Members is the best way to ensure that important stakeholder groups continue to be involved in the decisions affecting them. It may be more appropriate, as an alternative, to invite appropriate people/organisations to relevant meetings or to involve them in individual pieces of work of the Panel, rather than having them as permanent members on the Panel.
                                  Background Papers:
                                  None
                                69

                                SERVICE MONITORING REPORT

                                CABINET: 24 JULY 2008

                                MEMBER REPORTING: COUNCILLOR HILTON

                                1. PURPOSE OF REPORT

                                To enable members to monitor current Council performance and to seek approval for budget changes outlined in Member’s Recommendation.
                                  2. MEMBER'S RECOMMENDATION: That:
                                    i) The provisional revenue and capital outturn figures be noted;

                                    ii)The capital programme variances and slippage (including the award of IT contracts) identified in paragraph 3.2.9 be noted;

                                    iii) Directors work with Lead members to develop proposals to contain expenditure within current budget limits.

                                  3. SUPPORTING INFORMATION

                                  3.1 Wards Affected
                                  None specifically, this internal report considers performance across the whole borough.

                                  3.2 Relevant Matters Upon Which Decision is Based & Reasons Supporting Recommendation.

                                  3.2.1 Summaries of the Council’s provisional outturn Revenue and Capital financial reports are attached as Appendices A and B respectively. The revenue report includes income and expenditure statements together with a short Directorate drawing members’ attention to key activities affecting the current and future years.

                                  3.2.2 The detailed financial information is available on the Council’s intranet.

                                  REVENUE
                                  3.2.3 Total service expenditure for 2008/9 is expected to be £86,238k (last month: £85,986k), which is £543k (£345k) above the current approved estimate of £85,695k (£85,641k). The approved estimate has increased by £54k since last month because of a supplementary estimate for in-house homecare severance costs (Learning & Care +£40k) and LPSA funding for a Drug Action Officer (Learning & Care +£14k).

                                  3.2.4 The Director of Learning & Care reports that its 2008-9 costs are projected to be overspent by £320k (last month: £272k).

                                  Early estimates suggest that the Children’s Services budget will be overspent by £231k, partly because of pressures on the youth service budget from delays in the move of the youth centre to Marlow Road (£77k) and high placement costs for disabled children (£95k) and looked after children (£56k).

                                  The Adult Social Care budget is expected to be overspent by £84k. Cost pressures are being felt from increasing demand for Mental Health Services – there are a growing number of service users with an Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The Joint Commissioning Team has received a grant for £82k for stroke care.


                                  3.2.5 The Director of Community Services reports a variance of £150k (last month: £nil) from the approved estimate. There is a potential shortfall in car parking income of £150k. Additional legal costs concerning Badnells Pit (£40k), and a shortfall in S38 and S278 income in Transport Policy and Implementation (£20k) have been matched by savings from staff vacancies in the Development Control Unit (-£60k).

                                  3.2.6 The Chief Executive reports that Corporate Services expenditure is expected to be £73k higher than the approved estimate, the same as last month. The main variance remains the expected reduction in income from local land charges of £100k. Whilst RBWM hoped to encourage more full searches to be carried out by house buyers by offering block discounts to solicitors and HIPs providers, a positive outcome from these discussions is no longer anticipated.

                                  OVERALL POSITION
                                  3.2.7 Appendix A summarises the project outturn position and shows project year end reserves to be £5.201m, a decrease of £281k since last month including non-service activities.

                                  In addition to the expected overspends in Learning & Care (£48k + supplementary estimate of £40k re. homecare) and Community Services (£150k), within non-service activities there is a variance of £44k on corporate initiatives compared to last month. Sub-regional target savings attributable to RBWM from the Berkshire Procurement and Shared Service Unit (BPSSU) have been reduced, largely because of implementation delays.

                                  CAPITAL
                                  3.2.8 Overall Gross Expenditure Budget

                                  Since May's approved budget, there have been movements to reflect the deletion of Thames Path Link & addition of Maidenhead Library Floors & carpets as reported in the previous capital monitoring report. The approved gross budget now stands at £35,491k

                                  Exp Inc Net £'000 £'000 £'000
                                  Approved Budget June 2008 35,491 -22,406 13,085
                                  Variances identified in June -18 -25 -43
                                  Slippage to 2009/10 -130 0 -130
                                  Projected capital expenditure for 2008/9 35,343 -22,431 12,912

                                  3.2.9 Projected Variances and Slippage

                                  The -£18k variances & £130k slippage to 2009/10 summarised above are as follows:-

                                  Community Services report that in comparison to the approved budget, capital schemes are likely to be underspent by £52k in the following areas.

                                  £’000
                                  -30 CEDS Improvement Grants. Expenditure reduced by £30k to match income.
                                  25 CR78 Ascot Hall & Library Improvements. Fully funded s106 exp.
                                  -50 CG15 Nicholsons CP Lift Renewal - Contractor cost lower than anticipated
                                  3 CG16 Nicholsons CP Structural Maintenance - unaccrued retention

                                  Learning & Care report that in comparison to the approved budget, capital schemes are likely to be overspent by £34k in the following areas

                                  £’000
                                  11 CJUZ Furze Platt Dance Studio- Additional expenditure to pay final disputed invoice.
                                  10 CKRE Dedworth Green Rewire & Fire Alarm - higher than anticipated tender cost
                                  13 CKSB Wraysbury Rewire & Fire Alarm-higher than anticipated tender cost

                                  Whilst there are no variances to report for Corporate Services the directors group considered tenders in respect of the Procurement of Centralised Storage, Virtualisation Software and Disaster recovery hardware and software. After considering contractor proposals and costs the contract is awarded to Intercept IT Ltd at a cost of £499,518 (for hardware, software and services), £78,000 to 3Ctech Ltd (for server hardware) and £9,500 to Phoenix Software Ltd (for software). The total project cost is therefore £606,698 and is met from the capital programme provision of £607,000. Cabinet is asked to note the award of this contact which will give financial benefits as well as operational efficiencies.

                                  In addition to the £100k slippage to 2009/10 identified in May's monitoring report, a further £30k has been identified. This relates to a Parks & Open Spaces scheme - Fir Tree Walk Improvements within the Community services Directorate. The scheme has been deferred pending identification of external funding.


                                  3.2.10 Overall Programme Status

                                  The project statistics show the following position:


                                  Number of Schemes in Programme 432
                                  Yet to Start 61%
                                  In Progress 12%
                                  Completed 7%
                                  Ongoing Programmes e.g.. Disabled Facilities Grant 6%
                                  Devolved Formula Capital Grant schemes
                                  (Data not available on budgets devolved to schools) 14%

                                  3.3 Options Available and Risk Assessment
                                    Option
                                    Comments
                                    1. Accept the reportDirectors have a responsibility for managing their Services within the Budget approved by Council. Cabinet has limited power to vary those budgets within the overall budget and policy framework or to re-define the priorities agreed when the budget was approved. Cabinet does however have responsibility for considering the impact on future years budgets of the decisions taken.
                                    2. Reject the reportThis is not an option as The Local Government Act 2003 requires the Royal Borough to monitor its financial position


                                  3.4 Relevant National/Regional Guidance
                                  The Local Government Act 2003 Section 28 specifically requires an authority to monitor its financial position during the year and take such action to ensure its financial position is not worse than that budgeted
                                    3.5 Relevant Council Policies/Strategies The Councils budget is fundamental to the delivery of all the Council’s Strategies. The recommendations in this report do not directly contribute to the Community Strategy
                                      4. CONSULTATION CARRIED OUT

                                      4.1 Consultation was carried out as part of the budgeting process. Unbudgeted significant variations are the subject of separate consultation and report.

                                      4.2 Scrutiny panels have noted the previously reported monitoring statements. At its meeting on the 9th October the Corporate Services Overview & Scrutiny Panel asked to see, on a regular basis, the whole service monitoring report, rather than just the Corporate Services elements, in order to fulfil its overall responsibility for ensuring that reporting standards are maintained.

                                      5. IMPLICATIONS

                                      5.1. Financial
                                      The Councils Medium Term Financial Plan will be changed to reflect the revenue and capital out-turn positions and improvements identified during the closure of Accounts process.
                                        5.2. Legal
                                        The Council’s external auditor has powers to qualify its annual accounts if there were regular and significant annual budget variations. Such qualification would affect the authority’s Comprehensive Performance Assessment standing.
                                          5.3. Human Right Act
                                          None
                                            5.4. Planning
                                            None

                                            5.5. Sustainable Development
                                            None

                                            5.6. Diversity and Equality
                                            None

                                            Background Papers: Cabinet 26 June 2008 – Monitoring report.

                                            meetings_080804_cslosp_service_monitoring_appendix_1.pdf Meetings 080804 Cslosp Service Monitoring Appendix 1


                                            meetings_080804_cslosp_service_monitoring_appendix_2.pdf Meetings 080804 Cslosp Service Monitoring Appendix 2


                                            meetings_080804_cslosp_service_monitoring_appendix_3.pdf Meetings 080804 Cslosp Service Monitoring Appendix 3


                                            meetings_080804_cslosp_service_monitoring_appendix_4.pdf Meetings 080804 Cslosp Service Monitoring Appendix 4


                                            meetings_080804_cslosp_service_monitoring_appendix_5.pdf Meetings 080804 Cslosp Service Monitoring Appendix 5